behemoth - zos kia cultus

Behemoth: Zos Kia Cultus (2002)

Behemoth is back and surprise: they’re still angry at God.  I’m pretty sure I bought both Zos Kia Cultus at the same time as Thelema.6 to try the band out, and listening back there’s a lot I like: things have evolved somewhat, taking a (very) slightly slower approach, more bottom-heavy and menacing, but still ready to riff your head six feet in the ground.  Occult and Aleister Crowley reign over the proceedings, but since I can barely understand the words, it has little impact to the punishing hooks contained o the album. Continue reading “Behemoth: Zos Kia Cultus (2002)”

behemoth - thelma.6

Behemoth: Thelema.6 (2000)

You have to embrace the ridiculous a little bit when it comes to extreme metal.  Otherwise the act just falls into pretension.  For all of his posturing, Behemoth frontman Adam “Nergal” Darski knows a certain amount of pop and circumstance give life to his musical entity, and he embraces it.  Thelema.6 eschews the more blackened elements of the band’s earlier output in favor of a real slick, dare I say catchy death metal that still sounds great, even better than a lot of his later output.  It remains one of my favorite releases from the band, and that’s even without the David Bowie cover. Continue reading “Behemoth: Thelema.6 (2000)”

bedhead - 1994-1998

Bedhead: 1992-1998 (2014)

WhatFunLifeWas.  Beheaded.  Transaction de Novo.  I had no idea these albums existed two years ago.  I was unaware of Bedhead, the band that created this music, or the slow core scene in general.  And yet I’ve always known this music.  In a real sense, the music of Bedhead is the music that has always played in the quiet hours inside my head ruminating and reflecting on questions I’ve had my entire life.  Bedhead 1992-1998 is a boxset of the band’s collected output, and to say that for me it’s become one fo the essential musical components of my life is not an exaggeration. Continue reading “Bedhead: 1992-1998 (2014)”

becoming the archetype - terminate damnation

Becoming the Archetype: Terminate Damnation (2005)

2005 was the year I really dove back into what was happening in modern metal.  Over at Nine Circles I ran a series of articles about the many albums I had relegated to binders, and over the course of 3 entries and almost 30 albums I think there were over a dozen just from that year.  One of the bands I didn’t cover was Becoming the Archetype, and that’s that’s because their 2005 debut Terminate Damnation was never pushed to binder status.  This is epic thrashing modern metal that holds up ridiculously well, bridging progressive and technical death metal with elements of metalcore wrapped in a strong, unyielding Christian ethos.  God approves, and so do I. Continue reading “Becoming the Archetype: Terminate Damnation (2005)”

becoming akh - absolute truth

Becoming Akh: Absolute Truth (2017)

With Absolute Truth must come abolsute truth.  The sophomore LP and continuing conceptual narrative from Portland one man death machine Becoming Akh is more complex, more technical and, sadly more unlistenable.  Forsaking anything even remotely related to low-end frequencies, it’s painful to try and got to the admittedly technical prowess on display throughout the record. Continue reading “Becoming Akh: Absolute Truth (2017)”

Becoming Akh - Abolisher

Becoming Akh: Abolisher EP (2015)

What what I knew about Becoming Akh before coming into their 2015 EP Abolisher.  It was metal, and it was on Transcending Records.  I got the album and about a dozen others like it as part of a campaign to help Transcending Records with a flood that devastated their merchandise.  I even wrote about it on Nine Circles.  The first of a two-part concert album, Abolisher deals in a kind of mechanized progressive death/djent that sits high in a few sonic frequencies and eschews the rest. Continue reading “Becoming Akh: Abolisher EP (2015)”

beck - modern guilt

Beck: Modern Guilt (2008)

To start, this was not the Beck album I thought I was going to write about.  I went into the morning happy to revisit an old friend, a sunny, chill psychedelic folk album that reminded me of gots lazy days and warm introspection.  Well, that album was Morning Phase, an album I apprarently don’t own despite really enjoying.  Instead, I have Modern Guilt, Mr. Beck Hansen’s brief but listless 2008 effort that starts promising but ultimately leaves almost no impression once it’s over. Continue reading “Beck: Modern Guilt (2008)”