behemoth - demigod

Behemoth: Demigod (2004)

It’s not that Demigod, the 2004 followup to Zos Kia Cultus by Behemoth is bad…it’s not.  It’s just that this is the first album where the songs really begin to blur and I lose interest about halfway through.  There’s less distinction through the album, less that jumps out and grabs you.  This is blessing and curse of blind buying based on previous albums: sometimes you get gold, sometimes you get, well…meh. Continue reading “Behemoth: Demigod (2004)”

behemoth - zos kia cultus

Behemoth: Zos Kia Cultus (2002)

Behemoth is back and surprise: they’re still angry at God.  I’m pretty sure I bought both Zos Kia Cultus at the same time as Thelema.6 to try the band out, and listening back there’s a lot I like: things have evolved somewhat, taking a (very) slightly slower approach, more bottom-heavy and menacing, but still ready to riff your head six feet in the ground.  Occult and Aleister Crowley reign over the proceedings, but since I can barely understand the words, it has little impact to the punishing hooks contained o the album. Continue reading “Behemoth: Zos Kia Cultus (2002)”

behemoth - thelma.6

Behemoth: Thelema.6 (2000)

You have to embrace the ridiculous a little bit when it comes to extreme metal.  Otherwise the act just falls into pretension.  For all of his posturing, Behemoth frontman Adam “Nergal” Darski knows a certain amount of pop and circumstance give life to his musical entity, and he embraces it.  Thelema.6 eschews the more blackened elements of the band’s earlier output in favor of a real slick, dare I say catchy death metal that still sounds great, even better than a lot of his later output.  It remains one of my favorite releases from the band, and that’s even without the David Bowie cover. Continue reading “Behemoth: Thelema.6 (2000)”

becoming the archetype - terminate damnation

Becoming the Archetype: Terminate Damnation (2005)

2005 was the year I really dove back into what was happening in modern metal.  Over at Nine Circles I ran a series of articles about the many albums I had relegated to binders, and over the course of 3 entries and almost 30 albums I think there were over a dozen just from that year.  One of the bands I didn’t cover was Becoming the Archetype, and that’s that’s because their 2005 debut Terminate Damnation was never pushed to binder status.  This is epic thrashing modern metal that holds up ridiculously well, bridging progressive and technical death metal with elements of metalcore wrapped in a strong, unyielding Christian ethos.  God approves, and so do I. Continue reading “Becoming the Archetype: Terminate Damnation (2005)”

bathory - nordland ii

Bathroy: Nordland II (2003)

The 12th and final album from Bathory is a continuation of the Nordland saga set forth on 2002’s Nordland I.  For better or worse, Nordland II is a case of “second verse, same as the first” meaning there are pockets of brilliance and pockets of just waiting for the next song to come on.  You can argue whether one album is better than another, but the truth is there’s a remarkable consistency to the records.  That consistency however means everything feels interchangeable instead of progression that leads to fabled destination. Continue reading “Bathroy: Nordland II (2003)”

bathory - nordland i

Bathory: Nordland I (2002)

After Twilight of the Gods solidified the place of Bathory among the progenitors of viking metal, things went a bit astray.  Quorthon put out a solo album, and Bathory went back to the blackened thrash of the earlier albums for a time.  Nothing quite seemed to congeal.  That is until Nordland I, the first of a planned four-part masterwork that would bring back the viking metal in full force to walk through the tales of Nordic myths and legends.  This was my first real experience experience with Bathory, and similar to to when I first heard it, there’s a lot that works and admittedly a bit that doesn’t. Continue reading “Bathory: Nordland I (2002)”